Humidor question...

Apr 5, 2004
289
0
NJ
#1
I've had my humidor in my basement for the past few weeks (basement is at a constant 68 degrees with the RH being 67-68%. I decided to move the humidor upstairs to my bedroom. The temp up here is 72-75 degrees with the RH around 65-68%. Which is better for the cigars? It appears that there is a trade off between temp and RH. What do the experts say and which would you prefer? Thanks for your time gentlemen. Simp
 
May 28, 2004
965
0
Tombstone, AZ
#2
I find it a matter of preference. My contriband stash seems better at a lower RH%. The NC, a bit higher. Your temp range seems fine. Just keep an eye out. Beetles tend to hatch over about 73 degrees.
 
Mar 17, 2004
164
0
#4
Not so fast there... Dep. of Agriculture says beetles can hatch at as low as 64º. :shock:

I´ve seen them (beetles) at exactly 70º so that 70/70 thought is a gamble.

I´d keep the cigars in the basement for long term storªge. . . The surroundings sound more ideal.
 
Mar 17, 2004
164
0
#6
and I quote. . .

". . .The cigars won't be 100% safe there either, however. Don't believe the old rumor that eggs won't hatch below 75° F. The USDA has discovered that eggs can hatch and the beetles can live their full life cycle, although slowed from their regular cycle, at temperatures as low as 65° F. "

http://cigars.about.com/library/weekly/ ... cco+beetle

- So I was off by a full degree! You should know I always screw up the change but never the dollar amount - by now!
8)
 
Mar 23, 2004
763
0
#8
Holy crap I didn't know anything about beetles. I think I am good to go as I have check my humidor before and hadn't noticed any red dust, of course I was not looking for it either.

Martin
 
Mar 17, 2004
164
0
#9
Martin - By the time you see red dust you could be in for a rude awakening and a mad scramble.

The best thing is to keep your cigars cool and out of sun-light.

New cigars, and gifts are likely to be your biggest risks. Consider isolating new acquisitions for a period after receiving them - Especially if they were shipped. (who knows what tempurature or conditions the cigar(s) experienced during travel). To issolate - get some big (thick freezer ziplocks).

Believe it or not, the couple of beetles that tried to throw a concert in a small insignificant (luckily) desktop humidor I had- ATE right through the cellophane! I'm not sure if that was what killed them or if they over-dosed on nicotine as they were fat & fairly dark in color from over endulging at the tobacco buffet!

As per another famous cigar dude - if you suspect or see a neatly drilled hole in a cigar - hold your cigars over a white piece of paper... Tap gently on the head... If pencil shavings "rain" out of the foot you either have a very poor quality cigar or more likely, beetles have eaten to where the roll is no longer bonded together. Rain = a lot of shavings that continuously drop out of the foot. It's perfectly normal for a couple of tiny loose pieces of filler to fly out of the foot (your humidor likely has tobacco crumbs of this sort in it every time you take a peak).
 
Mar 17, 2004
164
0
#10
Supplemental statement - It is key to remember... all tobacco generally has tobacco beetle (potential) present. It's about keeping them from hatching if they weren't irradicated from preventive measures prior to rolling.
 
Mar 23, 2004
763
0
#11
I sent that link to a couple of my friends who smoke and some said they knew about them others said they didn't. One of my friends that knew about them had this to say.


"Yes, I was fortunate enough to have a few of these critters in my humidor once. They destroyed my cuban cohiba's. Funny, when you smoked the cigar with those beetles in it, they pop like popcorn and you get a few ashes come flying out like fireworks...it's cool. Since then I always use a special liquid I get from tinder box and put it in a jar inside the humidor...it keeps the beetles out or kills them."


That would really suck. My friend could not remember what the liquid was, but said if I went to the tinder box they would know. Do you guys know of this stuff and what do you think of it?

Thanks
 
Mar 17, 2004
164
0
#12
Martin:

I don't know every trick in the book... BUT I know of NO liquid that rids a beetles. Well actually I should say I know of no liquid that would work on beetles and have no adverse effects on the cigars that they inhabbit. I'm sure gasoline or even a couple of moth-balls would have a hatched larvae looking for emergency exits - but I'm sure you can picture the state of your cigars after they sponged up the fumes - right? Are you sure your friend is not confusing this with the liquids you can add to your humidity device (sometimes referred to as a "creedo") - which prevents mold / mildew from occuring?

Here is why I think a liquid might be an exaggeration. The recommended safe way to dispose of beetles is through FREEZING. However... Pay close attention to what freezing acheives. It's not hypothermia and the things we as people associate with freezing to death that does the trick. The surest method is a deep freezing appliance (commercial grade). The object is to CRACK the larvae! If you freeze the cigars but don't reach a point where you cause the larvae to CRACK - you've done absolutely nothing and when conditions become ripe at a future time, the very same larvae CAN indeed hatch and pose the same old problem. A liquid that does the trick is hard to imagine... Once they hatch, they are trapped in a sealed environment that is filled with their favorite meal. If hatched, wouldn't it seem impossible for them to (get out) anyway?

As long as the larvae lay dormant you have to create conditions that physically destroy it (without physically destroying your cigars). A complicated task. . .

Also so that just in the minute-st of chances there is also the possiblility of MITES roaming your humidor which will also be tiny but visible bugs. These are harmless and are attracted to the gum based glue / paste that is used to fasten the bands around cigars.

I'm a student of all this too... so maybe there is some miracle liquid and take what I'm saying for what its worth... However I wouldn't be overly persistent with friends (at least not to the point) where it may seem like you are implying that they don't know what they are talking about. I find that everyone learns at their own pace. And then there are those who have to learn the Tim Hard(a)way.

8)
 
Sep 27, 2003
8,798
0
Puerto Rico/NYC
#13
Aw c'mon, you don't know what the liquid is, HP? It's BOURBON!!!

You coat the cigars in bourbon, then replace them in your humidor. After they dry out, the beetles are long since dead, but at least they died happy, and your cigars have that nice sweet, original American whiskey taste to them.

:cryinlaugh: :neer:
 
Aug 14, 2004
2,237
1
#14
I have a Box of Beetle traps upstairs in a drawer.
I bought them because I had never seen them before, but do not use them. Not sure what they are made of, but I know how they work.
It is a sticky paper that you place a small pellet in the middle of.
I bought them at Club Macadudo in NYC.
They require the use of them in their lockers.
I had given on to a friend and he had a beetle out-break.
Not one of them headed for the traps!

The best thing is to keep the cigars cool!
I store at 65/65
They do not age as fast, but I don't worry about beetle either.
If interested in the beetle traps PM me and I'll forward the info off the box.
Or I can post it here.
I am away all day/night tonight for a Cigar Party so I won't be able to dso it till tomorrow.
CC
 
Sep 27, 2003
8,798
0
Puerto Rico/NYC
#15
Actually CC, I believe that when cigars are stored at humidity levels less than 70, they actually age faster, because it is the higher humidity levels which prevent the drying of the oils and gradual release of nicotine, ammonia, etc. which cause the aging process. I could be wrong, because when it comes to this stuff I'm a buck private and you're a five star general, but in all my reading, I was led to believe this.
 

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